Frequently Asked Questions

Top FAQs

  • Can I wear soft contact lenses if I have astigmatism?

    Yes, you can wear a special type of soft contact lens called a toric lens which will correct your astigmatism.

  • Can I wear soft contact lenses if I need bifocals?

    Yes, there are a number of contact lenses designed for people who need bifocal (multifocal) correction.

  • Is a contact lens prescription different than a glasses prescription?

    Yes. When you order contact lenses, you must have a current contact lens prescription which specifies the power of the lenses, the size of the lens, the type and brand of lens.

  • If my 2 week disposable lenses are still comfortable and in good condition beyond 2 weeks, can I continue to wear the same pair?

    In order to maintain optimal eye health and comfort, it is important to adhere to the wearing schedule prescribed by your doctor. The main advantage of wearing disposable lenses is that you are putting a fresh new pair of lenses in your eyes every 2 weeks. Also, the convenient cleaning regimen of a disposable lens is only adequate for a 2 week wearing schedule.

  • If I only wear my 2 week disposable contacts part time, do I still have to replace them every 2 weeks?

    No, the 2 weeks refers to the actual amount of wearing time so they can last longer than 2 weeks if you are not wearing them full time.

  • Your website lists my lens as 2 week disposable, but my doctor says I can wear them for 4 weeks. Which is correct?

    The lens wearing schedules on our website are provided by contact lens manufacturers. However, doctors may decide on a different wearing schedule (shorter or longer) for an individual patient based on wearing habits, lifestyle, cleaning methods etc. You should always follow the wearing schedule prescribed by your doctor.

  • What's the difference between rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses and soft lenses?

    RGPs are smaller and made out of a harder, less pliable material than soft lenses which makes them less comfortable initially. RGPs correct some astigmatism whereas soft spherical lenses do not.

  • Can I swim with my contact lenses in?

    It is best if you don't because there are bacteria in the water that can adhere to your lenses and cause infections. If you do swim in your lenses, you should wear goggles over them and you should disinfect them immediately afterwards.

  • Why is it necessary for contact lens wearers to have regular eye exams even if their prescription hasn't changed?

    Regular eye exams are important not only to check your prescription but also to evaluate the health of your eyes. This is especially important for contact lens wearers because the contacts could be causing damage to your eyes without necessarily causing any obvious symptoms.

  • I wear contact lenses and in order for me to read, I have to wear reading glasses over them. Are there any other alternatives whereby I don't have to wear glasses at all?

    Yes, the most common option is called monovision where one eye is corrected for viewing distant objects and the other eye is corrected for reading and close work. Monovision is a good solution for some people, but not everybody can successfully adapt to the arrangement. Another alternative is bifocal contact lenses which are available in both rigid gas permeable or soft lens designs.

  • Do colored contact lenses work on dark eyes?

    Yes, they are called opaque contacts. Year-long (daily wear and extended wear) opaque contacts are available in many different colors and shades. There are also several disposable colored lenses for dark eyes including Freshlook Colors.

  • Do I still need a prescription if I just want contacts to change my eye color?

    Yes, you still need to be fitted for the lenses even if you don't need vision correction. This is because contact lenses are medical devices and wearing them can affect the health of your eyes.

  • How can you offer such low prices on contact lenses?

    We can offer low pricing because of our large purchasing power. We are able to negotiate the best possible pricing from contact lens manufacturers and distributors. We simply pass those savings along to our customers.

  • How long does it take for my lenses to arrive?

    98% of all US orders arrive within the 7-10 day delivery time stated on our website. However, the vast majority of orders that are shipped from stock will arrive significantly sooner.

  • What are UV Rays?

    Ultraviolet rays are rays located beyond the visible spectrum. UV rays are categorized into three types: UVA, UVB, and UVC. - UVA: Most common throughout the year. These rays pass through glass so the can be harmful both indoors and outdoors. - UVB: The most dangerous type of UV rays and the primary cause of skin burning and retina harm. Rays do not pass through glass. - UVC: Blocked by the Earth's Ozone layer and do not reach the Earth's surface.

  • What are Reading Glasses?

    Reading glasses are non-prescription eyeglasses that help correct close-range vision issues. People with presbyopia primarily wear reading glasses.

  • What is diopter?

    A diopter is a unit of measurement, specifically, magnification. The larger the number, the more powerful the magnification and the easier to read text.

  • Is a prescription required to purchase reading glasses?

    No. Reading glasses are available in standard, select powers, typically ranging from +1.00 to +4.00.

  • What is Presbyopia?

    It is a condition that progresses with age where the eyes diminish in the ability to focus on near objects. Reading glasses help magnify object or text, thus relieving strain on your eyes.

  • What type of lenses can I wear swimming?

    It is not recommended to wear contacts or eyeglasses when swimming. Prescription swimming goggles are a safe alternative to wear swimming.

  • What are UV Protected Swimming Goggles?

    Similar to sunglasses, these swimming goggles offer UV protection to the eyes.

  • Is it safe to use any eyedrops when wearing contacts?

    No. Only eyedrops specifically designed for contact wearers should be used.

  • What are Computer Glasses?

    For those who spend a significant amount of time on a computer, special glasses have been developed. Special anti-reflective lenses reduce glare from a bright screen to help reduce eye strain and headaches.

  • Do I need to replace my contact case?

    Yes. Bacteria and enzymes collect in your contact case over time. It is highly recommended you replace your contact case with every contact replacement. Replace your case at least every month if you have extended wear contacts.

  • What's the difference between my eyeglasses prescription and contact lens prescription?

    An eyeglass prescription is not a contact lens prescription, and cannot be used to order contact lenses and vice versa. Each prescription contains information that is specific to the type of correction. Contact lenses sit directly on the eye whereas glasses are worn on the bridge of the nose. The distance between these two spaces dramatically changes the level of correction for each type. Also, not everyone who needs eyeglasses can wear contact lenses.

  • My prescription has expired or it doesn't have an expiration date, can I still order contacts?

    We can only fill orders for unexpired prescriptions. If your prescription does not have an expiration date, then the expiration date is either 1 or 2 years from your exam date, depending on your doctor's preference. We will verify your prescription with your doctor and notify you if the prescription is expired.

  • How can I be sure I receive email offers and updates from you?

    You should add service@mylensplan.com to your whitelist or "friends" to make sure our emails are correctly received. If you change your email address, please take a moment to log-in to your account, and update to the new address.

  • Why wasn't the item I ordered covered by my insurance?

    The item is an exclusion of your vision plan. Please refer to your Certificate of Coverage for additional information.

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